Controversy: Good or bad?

HOLLOWMy first book, Hollow, is featured in the Halloween reads on the indieBRAG website this week.  I was thrilled a few years ago when my first foray into indie publishing was awarded this prestigious award.

Since then, I wrote three more books in this series featuring former pastor’s wife, Bunny Elder, and have begun a new series, as well.

When I first published Hollow, I didn’t list it as Christian Fiction because I considered it to be more a book about a woman who happened to be a Christian than inspirational reading.  Some readers complained about the Scripture verses and overt religious content, even going so far as to accuse me of trying slip one over on them by not labeling the book Christian. So, I added the Christian label.  You guessed it; this brought complaints and bad reviews from readers expecting a very different kind of novel.

While most reviewers seemed to get it, a few did not. However, the ratings remained in the 4.5 star range.

Once the series was complete, I set this book as perma-free. That’s when the attacks began in earnest. Even though I tweaked the description to alert readers to the nature of the book, the ratings have fallen to 3.7 stars, as of this morning, although the others in the series remain above 4 stars.

My question for you is, “Can the controversy surrounding this first book be turned into some sort of advantage, or should it be ignored?”

One Response

  1. Linda Houchins

    Ignore it. If the book’s main character had made reference to the Quran or the Vinaya or Tao Te Ching, I imagine nobody would have cared. That’s one of the chances you take when you purchase a book without being able to flip through it for a quick “look-see.” Besides, don’t want we want our eyes opened to the views of others so that we can better understand those around us? Reading another’s description of their beliefs doesn’t mean I’m going to adopt them.

Leave a Reply